In Defense of Ziggy


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Detroit Lions fans are understandably quite weary of the team’s most recent draft pick: Ziggy Ansah (DE, BYU), the 5th overall pick in the 2013 Draft. Well call me the contrarian, because I think Ansah will be a great player for the Lions. Pollyanish? Actually, I think that if you take a closer look at his background, and his combination of size, speed, and athleticism you just might come away from this a bit more optimistic. But before I go on fawning over the guy, it’s important to understand context here: the nature of the NFL Draft.

Take a look at where the most elite players in the NFL were drafted and you’ll see that no one can predict with any real precision, how great a player will turn out. For every Peyton Manning there’s a Tom Brady; for every Jason Witten, there’s a Jimmy Graham or Rob Gronkowski; for every….well, you get the point. Often times, it can be tough to project how well a player’s skills will translate to the next level; especially in a year when many consider the top-level talent to be thin.

Compounding the issue of top-level depth was the issue of need. With the top 3 offensive tackles going first, second and 4th, respectively, the Lions missed out on addressing their most glaring need- offensive tackle. Thus, they were only left with the choice of either trading down for more picks, or drafting most likely LSU DE Barkevius Mingo, Alabama corner Dee Milliner, or Ansah. While I would have equally endorsed the Milliner pick, given his speed, size and pedigree, I don’t think I would have chosen Mingo over Ansah. At 6’4”, 248 lbs., he wouldn’t have been a great fit for the Lions 4-3 wide 9 scheme. Sure he’s played against superior competition, but the metrics here just don’t work as well. And anyway, Ansah has a higher ceiling. Maybe trading down would have helped, but then who would they have taken, at which pick, in exchange for what? Given those choices, I like Ansah as the pick the most. If anything, the kid has the sort of attributes that make great players, just look at his background.

Ansah came to the US from Ghana on an academic scholarship hoping to walk on to the basketball team. As a member of the Church of Latter-Day Saints, he chose to do so at BYU. Having failed to make the basketball team, Ansah was encouraged to move over to football where he finally flourished in his 3rd season. Ansah knew very little about football before he came here. Yet he was able to walk on to the football team (and track team where he ran a 10.91 in the 100m).

As a senior, he played every position on the defensive line, including nose tackle, registering 4.5 sacks and 62 tackles. Is that enough to merit first round consideration in the draft? Well, no. For one, 4.5 sacks isn’t all that impressive. But keep in mind, he played 5 different positions at BYU. He wasn’t merely a rush end so his numbers are a bit skewed. What was impressive however was how Ansah managed to dominate at the Senior Bowl. Under the guidance of the Lions coaching staff, Ansah led the South defense with seven tackles (3.5 for loss), 1.5 sacks and a forced fumble, raising the eyebrows of NFL brass everywhere. From there, he went on and ran a 4.6 at the NFL combine; for a 6’5” 271 lbs end that’s pretty impressive.

As a Lion, he will play for a head coach in Jim Schwartz that has coached his share of great defensive players in the NFL (Haynesworth, Suh, Vanden Bosch), and he will again be able to have an impact in different ways. The Lions will likely move the newly acquired Jason Jones around on the defensive line, as they have done with Ndamukong Suh. Down the road, they could use Ansah in a similar capacity.

Nevertheless, Ansah’s success will likely turn on his character, and this is where I think the Lions may benefit the most. This is a kid that is living a real-life fantasy. A few years ago he emigrated here from Ghana in pursuit of a dream to play basketball. Today he’s an NFL player and a millionaire. He’s worked hard to learn the game.  He’s smart, and he seems humble. Considering Ansah’s journey, he might realize, more so than his fellow players, that playing in the NFL is a privilege. Just one more reason why I think Ansah will be an excellent addition to the Lions.

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2 thoughts on “In Defense of Ziggy

  1. Only 9 starts at BYU & Stats = Meh. Versus one eye-catching performance at the Senior Bowl and superb size, speed, & athleticism. This is a gamble pick no matter how you look at it. He is going to be a project, not sure that’s what you want from your #1 overall, that’s for picks from later rounds. Milliner had too much injury baggage for my taste, so I understand why they passed on him. Mingo to me would have been the safe pick. I think he could be a solid role player at OLB at the next level. But, I’m not much of a gambler. Best of luck to the Lions.

  2. Thanks for the comment. A few thoughts:

    1. The whole draft is a gamble; even more so in a year where the talent is weak at the top. There is no one pick the Lions could have made at 5 that would have been acceptable to the masses. They don’t need an LB, and Mingo’s too small to play rush end in a 4-3 system, so he wouldn’t have worked there.

    2. His stats are meh because he wasn’t just a rush end at BYU. He also played 3-tech, nose and a little OLB so the stats are misleading.

    3. I do agree that it could take some time for him to adjust, but the Lions saw first hand at the Senior Bowl how quickly he could learn, which explains why he dominated there. If they hadn’t coached him the Senior Bowl, I’d be much less favorable to the pick.

    But given the totality of circumstances, it makes sense.

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